Search

ERGOT

Tag

kidney

TransplantModels.com

Five of ERGOT’s developed transplant models can be found at transplantmodels.com.

Living Donor Risk Index (LKDPI)
This model predicts recipient risk of graft loss after living donor kidney transplantation based on donor characteristics, on the same scale as the KDPI.

ESRD Risk Tool for Kidney Donor Candidates
This model is intended for low-risk adults considering living kidney donation in the United States. It provides an estimate of 15-year and lifetime incidence of end-stage renal disease.

Infectious Risk Donors
When a patient with end stage renal disease (ESRD) on the waitlist for a kidney is offered an Infectious Risk Donor (IRD) kidney, they need to decide whether they will accept the IRD kidney and the associated infectious risk, or if they will decline it and continue to wait for the next available infectious-risk free kidney.

Transplant Candidacy for Patients 65+
This prediction model is intended for adults with ESRD on dialysis aged 65 and above; it provides the predicted probability of 3-year survival after kidney transplantation (KT). Patients with predicted 3-year post-KT survival in the top quintile are deemed “excellent” candidates.

Pediatric Transplant: Living or deceased donor first?
Most pediatric kidney transplant recipients live long enough to require retransplantation. The most beneficial timing for living donor transplantation in candidates with one living donor is not clear.

Recipient Outcomes Following Transplantation of Allografts From Live Kidney Donors Who Subsequently Developed End-Stage Renal Disease

The American Journal of Transplantation dedicated their December issue to organ donors who gave the gift of life to over 13,066 people this year (as of 11/18/2016).

At ERGOT, we care about the health and well being of live donors. In Recipient Outcomes Following Transplantation of Allografts From Live Kidney Donors Who Subsequently Developed End-Stage Renal Disease, data shows that preexisting kidney disease might be one mechanism underlying live donor end-stage renal disease.

Doctors Use Hepatitis C-Infected Kidneys to Save Lives

Drs. Niraj Desai and Christine Durand talk with CBS Baltimore about transplanting patients with hepatitis C-infected kidneys. The Johns Hopkins trial includes 10 patients from Baltimore, 5 of which have already been transplanted.

This is now a viable option now the hepatitis C is curable. This has the potential to shrink the transplant waitlist which is currently over 200,000 people in the US, 82-percent of whom need kidneys.

“If we had enough organs, we wouldn’t do this,” says Dr. Desai.

First HIV-positive to HIV-positive transplant in the US

After six years of starting the campaign in Washington D.C. and after three years of passing the HOPE Act, Johns Hopkins performs the first HIV-positive to HIV-positive transplant in the US. ERGOT’s own Dr. Dorry Segev took part in front-running for the change in legislation that now allows the once illegal practice of donating and transplanting HIV-positive organs.

Photo credit to KRISTOPHER RADDER/U.S. Navy

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑